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The mansion was built in the early eighteenth century and was completed in 1735 for Don José Bernardo de Tagle Bracho who, de1730 November 26, King Philip V of Spain, by virtue of his extensive service to the Crown, granted the title of Marquis of Torre Tagle, making it the founder of the Marquis.

Restored between 1954 and 1956 by Spanish architect Andrew Boyer, is now, since 1918, the headquarters of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Peru, the Deputy Minister and the National Protocol. Visitors can only access to patios.

The hallway leads into the first courtyard, spacious entrance, large, bright and surrounded by balusters elegant arches and Moorish columns, conceived as the vital center of the whole ensemble that gravitates toward him.

The Baroque style is mostly Moorish Andalusian obvious influence on both floors surrounding the courtyard. On the upper floor is reached by a spacious and opulent staircase whose input is a remarkable stone beautiful cover trefoil arches, like those of the upper floor, exhibit Andalusian Moorish influence.

The upper floor of this elegant family home gallery shows tile baseboards, cocobolo railing with balusters and fine mosaic floors. One of the rooms, called the Main Hall, holds the family portraits Torre Tagle, one of which shows Don José Bernardo de Tagle Bracho, the first Marquis of Torre Tagle, who became, in conclusion, the architect of the palace according to the inscription on the box "Captain of light horses, spears Puren Spanish Fort, in the conquest of the Kingdom of Chile, Governor of the war expeditions of the Pacific Ocean, Paymaster General perpetual prison of Callao and Real Armada. One of the biggest attractions of the palace is his chariot blue and red of the eighteenth century, which was used by the Marquis of Torre Tagle.
The second courtyard was used for stables and coach services, with floats at the time.

The mansion was built in the early eighteenth century and was completed in 1735 for Don José Bernardo de Tagle Bracho who, de1730 November 26, King Philip V of Spain, by virtue of his extensive service to the Crown, granted the title of Marquis of Torre Tagle, making it the founder of the Marquis.

Restored between 1954 and 1956 by Spanish architect Andrew Boyer, is now, since 1918, the headquarters of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Peru, the Deputy Minister and the National Protocol. Visitors can only access to patios.

The hallway leads into the first courtyard, spacious entrance, large, bright and surrounded by balusters elegant arches and Moorish columns, conceived as the vital center of the whole ensemble that gravitates toward him.

The Baroque style is mostly Moorish Andalusian obvious influence on both floors surrounding the courtyard. On the upper floor is reached by a spacious and opulent staircase whose input is a remarkable stone beautiful cover trefoil arches, like those of the upper floor, exhibit Andalusian Moorish influence.

The upper floor of this elegant family home gallery shows tile baseboards, cocobolo railing with balusters and fine mosaic floors. One of the rooms, called the Main Hall, holds the family portraits Torre Tagle, one of which shows Don José Bernardo de Tagle Bracho, the first Marquis of Torre Tagle, who became, in conclusion, the architect of the palace according to the inscription on the box "Captain of light horses, spears Puren Spanish Fort, in the conquest of the Kingdom of Chile, Governor of the war expeditions of the Pacific Ocean, Paymaster General perpetual prison of Callao and Real Armada. One of the biggest attractions of the palace is his chariot blue and red of the eighteenth century, which was used by the Marquis of Torre Tagle.
The second courtyard was used for stables and coach services, with floats at the time.