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The house or home Osambela Oquendo is a building of the colonial era and stands on the old novitiate of the Dominican fathers, destroyed by the earthquake of 1746, and part of the garden, fronting on the Calle de la Veracruz in the historic center of Lima, Peru. One of the largest mansions in downtown Lima and is notable for its broad facade and balconies of excellent quality.

The Osambela House, called the attention of scholars for two special features that distinguish the rest of the buildings of Lima at the time.

First, unlike most homes colonial Lima, the rooms of the house of Osambela are distributed in parallel to the street which makes its facade is large enough to house five drawer balconies and Louis XVI.

Similarly the distribution of their yards was the other way differing from the rest of the buildings of the colonial era, which ordered its distribution facilities "in depth" and not in the sense of the facade. Its other peculiarity lies in its four levels of elevation, instead of two, the fourth level is an octagonal gazebo which was prohibited at the time of its construction, earthquake precaution.

The main courtyard is notable for its sober nobility and the magnificent staircase leading to second floor. The second courtyard, which is reached by a narrow passage, it seems smaller and perhaps oldest of the eighteenth century.

The house or home Osambela Oquendo is a building of the colonial era and stands on the old novitiate of the Dominican fathers, destroyed by the earthquake of 1746, and part of the garden, fronting on the Calle de la Veracruz in the historic center of Lima, Peru. One of the largest mansions in downtown Lima and is notable for its broad facade and balconies of excellent quality.

The Osambela House, called the attention of scholars for two special features that distinguish the rest of the buildings of Lima at the time.

First, unlike most homes colonial Lima, the rooms of the house of Osambela are distributed in parallel to the street which makes its facade is large enough to house five drawer balconies and Louis XVI.

Similarly the distribution of their yards was the other way differing from the rest of the buildings of the colonial era, which ordered its distribution facilities "in depth" and not in the sense of the facade. Its other peculiarity lies in its four levels of elevation, instead of two, the fourth level is an octagonal gazebo which was prohibited at the time of its construction, earthquake precaution.

The main courtyard is notable for its sober nobility and the magnificent staircase leading to second floor. The second courtyard, which is reached by a narrow passage, it seems smaller and perhaps oldest of the eighteenth century.